Road washed away by floods closed until spring

flooding in the Ribble Valley
flooding in the Ribble Valley

A road washed away by floods will remain closed until the spring, the county council has confirmed.

Dunsop Road near Whitewell was severely damaged by last week’s floods.

Rotarians Syd Brown, Eddie Topping and president Andrew Wallbank collecting for flood victims at Barton Grange Garden Centre.

Rotarians Syd Brown, Eddie Topping and president Andrew Wallbank collecting for flood victims at Barton Grange Garden Centre.

Now Lancashire County Council has confirmed that they won’t be able to repair it until spring.

A council spokesman said: “A large section of the slope on the river side of Dunsop Road has slid away as a result of being saturated by water from the fields above.

“The road has been closed for safety as the slope supporting the carriageway is now very steep and has the potential to fail without warning and take out the road.

“We won’t be able to carry out repairs until the winter weather and river levels have subsided so the road will be closed until at least the spring.”

We won’t be able to carry out repairs until the winter weather and river levels have subsided

Lancashire County Council

The village of Whalley was also badly affected by the floods that followed Storm Desmond, with the main street turned into a river and businesses flooded out.

Members of Longridge and Preston North Rotary Club sprang into action last week, collecting funds for the Lancashire and Cumbria flood victims.

This is not the first time the club has collected in the wake of a flood, and members have been at the entrance to Barton Grange Garden Centre at Brock.

And by the end of Monday this week, around £6,000 had been generously thrown into the club’s buckets.

Collecting for flood victims at Barton Grange Garden Centre.

Collecting for flood victims at Barton Grange Garden Centre.

The club’s community chairman, Jack Giddins said they started in earnest last Wednesday and he has described the response as “incredible”.

He said they had wanted to carry out the collection while “it was fresh in people’s minds”.

Seven years ago they collected £17,500 for Cumbrian flood victims, but this time round their collection is for Lancashire victims too, many just “down the road” in St Michael’s on Wyre.

Mr Giddins said: “It has been incredible.

“People have really been amazingly generous.”

He said Government funding can often be slow to come through and the club already has a number of ideas on how the funds will be spent to help the victims.