Heavenly memories of hot potatoes and space

Rev reflections February 8 - Preston potato man, Gem Store advert Preston and St Thomas Primary School, Garstang school cup winners
Rev reflections February 8 - Preston potato man, Gem Store advert Preston and St Thomas Primary School, Garstang school cup winners

Did you, or do you still like to buy a bag of hot potatoes in town and warm your hands on them as well as enjoy eating them?

Bottled gas may have replaced coal or charcoal in their production but their taste with salt and butter is still heavenly and I hope my first picture (right) reminds you of this.

Rev reflections February 8 - Preston potato man, Gem Store advert Preston and St Thomas Primary School, Garstang school cup winners

Rev reflections February 8 - Preston potato man, Gem Store advert Preston and St Thomas Primary School, Garstang school cup winners

I use that phrase “heavenly” because it was on this day in 1973 that Skylab was launched by NASA.

When it fell back to earth after completing its remarkable mission and experiments in 1979, there was worldwide media attention.

The cost of this project had been $2.23 billion dollars so many of the tools and gadgets we use in our homes today are only possible because of the transistor, solar cell and telemetry technology that has come from such heavenly research.

Now to a pre decimalisation advertisement from the old Gem store in Preston. Just look at the prices there then (left).

Rev reflections February 8 - Preston potato man, Gem Store advert Preston and St Thomas Primary School, Garstang school cup winners

Rev reflections February 8 - Preston potato man, Gem Store advert Preston and St Thomas Primary School, Garstang school cup winners

It is some time since I used a football team picture and this one (above) goes back some 60 years when St Thomas’ School Garstang won the schools cup competition that year.

You may recognise someone here.

It will also bring back many memories of school sports and team games we took part in as children.

I am off now to refresh myself with a piping hot brew, but not before explaining the origin of that phrase.

The pipes which amplified the sound in the old cathedral pipe organs would hiss in the same way a kettle boiling does. The phrase piping hot was first introduced in the 1300s in Chaucer’s Canterbury tales for a hot, thin cake baked between wafer irons.