DCSIMG

Orienteers dig in on Beacon Fell

Club president, Peter Knott, club chairman, Mark Edwards and John Gillow from JA Jones Nursery planting one of the larger common oaks

Club president, Peter Knott, club chairman, Mark Edwards and John Gillow from JA Jones Nursery planting one of the larger common oaks

More than 20 members of the orienteering club for Garstang and Longridge rolled up their sleeves to help plant hundreds of trees at Beacon Fell.

More than 20 members of the orienteering club for Garstang and Longridge rolled up their sleeves to help plant hundreds of trees at Beacon Fell.

The event was organised to mark the 50th anniversary of the South Ribble Orienteering Club – the Red Rose Orienteers – which was formed in 1964 and was England’s first club in a sport then already well established in Scandinavia but which had only just started in the UK.

The club grew out of the South Ribble Search and Rescue Team, which was 
established in response to the tragedy of two teenage brothers, Melvyn and William Smith, who died of exposure after becoming lost whilst walking on the Bowland Fells.

Over the years the club and the sport, which involves navigating and running around a series of checkpoints using specially drawn maps, has grown from strength-to-strength. Current club members have won both British championship and World Masters titles.

The tree planting was arranged by Mark Gordon, of Global Renewables, acting on behalf of Lancashire County Council. Five large trees were donated by J A Jones Nursery, of Southport, to symbolise each decade of the club’s existence. The planting is part of the master plan for the sustainable development of Beacon Fell Country Park. The club’s development officer Martyn Roome, from Churchtown, said the club was delighted to be able to carry out the planting at the fell, which has been an excellent venue for the sport for many years.

The permanent course is very well used (map packs can be bought at any time at the visitor centre) and introductory events are held frequently.

The next such event is on Saturday, March 15, when anyone wishing to give “adventure running” (though walking is fine too!) a try will receive full help and advice.

The sport is suitable for everyone, aged from eight to over 80 – see www.sroc.org for further details.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page